The Mission Field of Motherhood Can Be a Fearful Thing


Entering the mission field of motherhood can be a fearful thing.

When we leave the hospital with a baby in the backseat, the objections begin, and they aren't easily silenced...
  • What if I have to give up too much for this child?
  • What if I lose valuable career opportunities to care for them?
  • What if my body never returns to "normal"?
  • What if I never get a full-night's sleep again?
  • What if I'm not "cool" anymore and I have to start choosing practical over aesthetic?
  • What if I give my all to raise up this child in the Lord, and they still rebel?
  • What if there is a complication and I lose my life or they lose theirs?
The "what-if's" of motherhood can be all-consuming, and they can cause rainclouds of burden to hover over our hearts. I mean, we want to make disciples. We want to love our children well. (But maybe not to the point of true discomfort or great loss.)

Here's the honest truth from my mom heart to yours:
Yes, there are great risks to entering the mission field of motherhood.
Yes, there are great risks to loving our children like Christ loved us.
Yes, there are great losses when we decide to make disciples of our children instead of just bringing them up in the ways of the world.

But there is good news! Jesus is very familiar with the risks and losses, and he still calls us to go. Jesus understands the costly nature of disciple-making more than anyone. To bring the gospel to us and show us how to walk in the way, he lost:
  • his comfort
  • his dignity
  • his physical well-being
  • his honor
  • his rest
  • his friends
  • and ultimately, his life.
He gave up everything so that we could have eternal life with God. He gave his life so that we could live with hope, having peace with God. Grace was costly. Disciplemaking included tears and and even some frustration. True love was about giving his life for ours, not about self-preservation.

And then, Jesus says, "follow me."

So why, mommas, do we think that the mission field of motherhood will be a relatively comfortable, easy, or self-glorifying task? Why do we go into it with limits on what we will spend, pour out, or give for this calling? Why do we fear the potential risks and losses?

Because Jesus is clear that a love like his is EXPENSIVE

The mission field of motherhood is a fearful thing, yes. People and the culture are going to object to the risks, the things you are going to lay down, and the parts of your life you will lose* to give life to another. 

But, momma, it's also worth the price.
You don't sacrifice yourself on the altar of motherhood for the sake of your children. Your children's good is not your ultimate purpose! But you do give yourself to God as a living sacrifice, valuing what he values - treasuring the exchange that life-giving requires. You treasure the lives he's entrusted to you, doing what it takes to live for God's glory and teach others to do the same.

Your motherhood isn't ultimately about you, anyway. About how good or bad you are, about how much you give up or how much you get. Your motherhood is about being an image-bearer, a disciple-maker, and a big billboard that points to the greatest treasure - Jesus, himself.

And because Jesus gets it,
And because he went first,
And because he did it for you,
YOU can do it for THEM.
Giving them the good news that will hopefully bear the fruit of faith in their lives forever.

Momma, the mission field of motherhood can be a fearful thing, but you can entrust your fears to a faithful God while doing good. Now, go forth and make disciples of all nations - from the crib next to your bed, to the room down the hall, to the neighbor down the street, all the way to the other side of the world.

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*Of course, mothers are also notorious for neglecting their own legitimate needs and that's not what I'm advocating here. A woman who has proper nutrition, adequate rest, and healthy opportunities for fellowship will likely do a better job of loving her children than a mom who hasn't taken care of herself at all. But in our culture, the pendulum often swings too far in favor of a mother's "right" to her "own time" because "she deserves it". It is this heart attitude that I don't see modeled in the life of Christ. A mom whose heart treasures Jesus, desiring to love others as he loved, will adequately consider how her self-care positively contributes to her ability to fulfill the great commission.



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